During this week's CES festivities, AOL was invited to participate in VivaKi's week of "Bright Lights, Big Ideas."

More than 200 VivaKi employees, clients and guests were treated to a packed content program. The evening was kicked off by Joshua Fruhlinger, editorial director for AOL Tech, who shared his perspectives on the first day of CES. From "LTE everything" to OLED to the age of superlatives: subtablets, superphones, and ultrabooks, Fruhlinger talked about the latest trends at the show. "Everything is mobile, everyone wants to show that what they have can run an app," he observed. "Angry Birds will be on everything from car dashboards to washing machines." Home networking will also be a big trend, as devices connect to the living room TV. For more of what's happening at the show, check out Engadget's complete CES coverage.

Next, Christian Kugel, AOL VP of Consumer Analytics and Research, took the stage. In anticipation of CES, Engadget identified ten trends – from inductive charging to electric motorcycles – that would impact 2012. Kugel's team then surveyed AOL Tech audiences to capture their interest and excitement of those trends. Readers ranked their top 3 game-changers as cloud computing, device convergence and the emergence of tablets as content creation devices. The audience roared at revelations that nearly half of AOL Tech readers would give up their pet rather than sacrifice their favorite gadget.

The evening concluded with lively conversation between Maurice Levy, Global CEO, Publicis Groupe, and AOL CEO Tim Armstrong. Praising Publicis Groupe as "the most game-changing holding company," Armstrong stated that no one else "took more of a risk" on digital media. Levy quipped: "Ah, we didn't know it was a risk." Levy agreed that convergence was one of the most important trends he was seeing at CES, and when Armstrong asked what advice he had for companies struggling with making the right decisions in a swiftly shifting business climate, Levy parried with a quick "Come see us!" They discussed how brands – not just products – need to be differentiators, and how the new digital landscape has the potential to be an "infinite world of possibility and creativity." Levy turned the tables on Armstrong and quizzed him on AOL's ultimate objectives – and where the company was in its journey. "AOL is about building content brands that matter, at scale," Armstrong responded. "I'd say we are in Inning Two on what we want to achieve."