On Wednesday, October 29th 1969, a UCLA graduate student named Charley Kline sent the first ever transmissions over the ARPANET – the research network that evolved into the Internet. Ahead of the 42nd anniversary of that momentous day, the AOL Mail Blog spoke to Charley (who is an AOL Mail user) about the origins of the internet, the role of email and the future of online communication".

We asked him a few questions around the future and past of the Internet and here's a small sample of what he said:


What is the future of online communication?

I've been talking about online video chatting for years. You had picture phones in the 60s but they were really expensive and pretty much didn't work. Now you have Skype and AV by AOL, but I think the next step is video mail where you can record a message and send it as an email.

In a world of social networking, is email still relevant?

On social networks everybody sees what you post. Unless it becomes more convenient to change this each time you post a message, email will remain useful when you want to talk directly to people.

Official messages like statements from your bank will still come via email especially as improved security and DomainKeys Identified Mail lets you know that it is a genuine message.

Then there are commercial services like daily deals newsletters. People won't want them cluttering up their Facebook page but email lets you filter them into folders until you're ready to read them.

To read the full interview, check out the AOL Mail Blog.