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Apr 22nd 2014

AOL Mail takes action against email spoofing

In our ongoing effort to protect your AOL Mail address from being used in connection with email spoofing, AOL Mail is immediately changing its policy to help mail providers reject email messages that are sent using forged AOL Mail addresses.

AOL is taking this step because spammers are sending email that appears to be from valid AOL email addresses. In fact, these emails do not originate from AOL or our customers. Rather, the outgoing addresses are edited by the spammers to make them appear to be legitimate AOL email addresses. By initiating this change, AOL Mail, along with other major email providers will reject these spoofed email messages, rather than deliver them to the recipient's inboxes.

We regret that legitimate senders of email may be temporarily impacted by this change, and those affected will need to update how they send email messages. We've detailed steps of how they can comply with our new policy here.

If you believe that your account has been compromised, or that your AOL Mail email address has been used to send spoofed messages, please visit the AOL Help site.

AOL takes the security of consumers very seriously and we are committed to continually improving our security protocols in an effort to prevent situations like this from occurring. We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused.

Oct 18th 2012

Introducing Alto


We'd like to introduce you to Alto, a new product from AOL. The premise behind Alto is simple: email has changed massively over the past twenty years, increasing in volume, complexity and frequency, yet the tools for reading email are no longer up to the challenge of organizing the volume of mail most people receive.

AOL introduced mass email to the consumer market but there is no doubt that times have changed since the era of "You've Got Mail", when most of your email came from a small group of trusted sources. Today, email comes in the form of retailer offers, store receipts, daily deals, social notifications, newsletters, work emails, friend emails and, let's not forget, good old spam. Email has changed dramatically since it was first introduced but the tools for reading, accessing and organizing email have not kept pace.

Many of us have multiple email accounts with which we try to manually filter what kind of mail make it to our inbox. Some few of us are "Type A" enough to use folders and labels and stars and archives to keep ourselves organized. But the vast majority of us simply hold onto everything we get and try to scan visually, or perform multiple searches, until we find what we're looking for. We think this is a pretty terrible experience so we built something we think is better – Alto.


Alto is, in essence, a digital manifestation of the process you go through when sorting your physical mail, where you stack your catalogs, your personal mail, your bills and your junk mail. Alto makes "stacks" out of social notifications from Facebook or Twitter, retail emails, daily deals and anything else you want to organize in your email. It's also smart enough to pull out and stack the things you might want to find easily, such as photos and attachments. To summarize, Alto does three really important things:

  1. Makes it easy to find things you're looking for.
  2. Cleans out your inbox so non-critical messages can wait until later without clogging up your message list.
  3. Resurfaces awesome things (like old photos) that you haven't seen in years because they were lost in the midst of all your old emails.

Here are some of the features we think are especially cool:

  • All-in-one - all your email addresses together in one simple app. Login at http://altomail.com using a web browser.
  • Smart - Stacks automatically pull out the emails you want and show you information you want see – deal with the non-essential stacks later.
  • Custom stacks – drag any message to create a stack – stacks will automatically pull out old messages as well as the new ones across ALL your accounts and folders.
  • Skip the inbox – send retail offers or daily deals straight into their stacks and keep your inbox clean.
  • Photos – all photos sent and received through any of their email accounts are automatically sorted into a dedicated photo stack. Users can share right from Alto to Facebook or Twitter.
  • People – contacts are made up of anyone to whom you've sent an email. By adding your Linkedin, Twitter and FB credentials, Alto pulls down key information and even shows recent messages, photos, and attachments between you and the contact.
  • Visual Search – Alto gives users a real-time visual search experience, providing a faster and more contextual way to let users find exactly what they need. As users search, they'll see instant results categorized by matching emails, contacts, photos, and attachments.

We've been building Alto for the better part of a year, and we think this is something special. We'd love for you to try it out, and we can't wait for your feedback. Alto is available in an invite-only beta – you can request access at this address: www.altomail.com.


Many thanks,
The Alto Team

Jul 26th 2012

AOL Mail Gets a Fresh Look

Our friends on the AOL Mail team today unveiled the new AOL Mail. They've been working all year on this roll out, which provides a cleaner, more modern mail, SMS, and AIM experience, and as of this week, every AOL Mail user is now using the same great new mailbox. The team has posted a great article that will help new and old users find their way around the new look, sharing some tips and tricks to help users get the most from their mailbox.

The new AOL Mail includes a set of "mini-apps" giving users a simple and efficient way to manage AIM, contacts, events, and to-do lists in a single location. AOL Mail also introduced a number of new themes and customization options so users can personalize the look and feel of their inbox.

Learn about these new features and more by reading the AOL Mail Blog. To stay updated with new features and changes, follow the team on Twitter or Like them on Facebook.

Apr 17th 2012

Reaching a Million People One Tweet at a Time

When we had the opportunity to rekindle our relationship with TOMS to help celebrate this year's One Day Without Shoes, we spent a lot of time of trying to think of the right way to extend our relationship. In 2011, we had over 1,000 employees all around the world kick off their shoes to raise awareness for children who don't have them.

At first, we considered the idea of doing something twice as big. And then ten times as big. And then 100 times as big, arriving at the number: 100,000. We decided interacting with 100,000 people to tell them about the One Day Without Shoes message would be the number that we would rally our employees and customers around. But how do you count people "we told about something"? It's relatively easy in social media to measure likes, followers, comments, and retweets by using some basic social media analysis tools - but what we were doing was something a little bit different. Each one of these social actions would contribute to the number of people we "told about something", and our goal was really just to reach people with the message.

We then turned to our friends at Simply Measured, and took a look at what reports they had available to help us and found that they were able to measure "Reach", a calculation that measured the potential audience size for our tweets (i.e. how many people may have seen our message through Tweets made by ourselves and others sharing the campaign). Reaching people through Tweets was something we do every day, but previously we'd been unable to quickly and effectively measure this on a campaign basis. Simply Measured has been a great partner to work with, and have even shared a bit more about the methodology used to measure our metrics in a case study on their blog.

The end result was a set of tactics that included ways for all sorts of different users, across a few different platforms, to help incite people to join the movement:

  • We donated a TOMS One Day Without Shoes mail sign in page that ran from April 7th to April 9th. The sign in page reaches an average of 10 million impressions a day**
  • Our about.me team encouraged consumers to change their profile pages to help raise awareness and blogged about the event.
  • AOL Advertising offered up a Style Your Sole party to the agency who was able to best evangelize their employees to share the word.
  • MapQuest donated advertising space on top of every map today to raise awareness about the campaign.
  • AOL Artists around the world are pledging to go barefoot with AOL as well. Check out AOL Artists' Tumblr for updates on which artists are going barefoot and to see them in action.
  • We shared the campaign in taxicab spots that ran in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and Boston (check out the video below).


All of these calls to action had a social component that would allow users to take an action, and then easily share what they were doing.

We launched our campaign on March 18th, with an initial goal of reaching 100,000 people by April 10th - the day of One Day Without Shoes. That day, we were lucky enough to have TOMS Chief Shoe Giver Blake Mycoskie join us to tell the story of TOMS and One Day Without Shoes. After the event, we started to invite our employees to contribute tweets about the topic, and offered a few tweets from our AOL Twitter account, and to our surprise, we were over our 100,000 reached goal in less than 18 hours. In the tradition of thinking big, we decided to reset our goal to one million. Sure enough, by the end of the campaign, we had some stats to be proud of that we want to share. In total, we reached:

  • A potential audience of more than 1.2 million people on Twitter
  • Around 20,000 people through About.me, where more than 600 people changed their profile to a special TOMS background. (read more about their success)**
  • Millions through the TOMS messaging on MapQuest and on AOL Mail.**
  • Nearly 200,000 people who visited the TOMS page on AOL Impact**
  • Hundreds of employees took part in events all across our offices and shared the news via Twitter


It was great to see so many people respond positively to our campaign and us to learn a lot more about how social content can spread.

Reflecting on AOL's contribution, Blake added, "Because of AOL's continued support of One Day Without Shoes, we were able to make an impact. Through this year's partnership, we built a program with highly measurable results. We can't thank enough everyone that participated, and because of your contributions, we were able to bring so much more awareness to our cause."

We hope you were able to take part in TOMS One Day Without Shoes and if not this year, then mark your calendar for next year! Learn more about the TOMS One for One movement at TOMS.com.


(Photo by Eileen O'Brien)

** Internal AOL Data

Apr 10th 2012

AOL Celebrates TOMS' One Day Without Shoes


Back in March, Blake Mycoskie, Founder and Chief Shoe Giver of TOMS, stopped by our offices to share the story of TOMS, the impact his revolutionary one-for-one model has had on the world, and explain why the One Day without Shoes campaign plays such an integral part in his company's mission.

Last year, more than 1,000 AOLers went barefoot and due to the amazing employee response we received, we decided to increase our impact and help spread the word not just to employees, but to our clients and consumers as well. In order to do this, we launched the 100,000 Voices Challenge on AOL Impact, a social media campaign aimed to spread the word by reaching 100,000 people with the One Day Without Shoes (ODWS). You can learn more about the 100,000 challenge by visiting our ODWS page on AOL Impact, and also be entered to win a $50 TOMS gift card *

We are excited to announce that we blew past our initial goal of 100,000, and were able to reach over 1,000,000 people (and still growing) with the ODWS message! We were able to do this by leveraging all of our best-in-class assets to spread the word. Here's how we did it:

  • We donated a TOMS One Day Without Shoes mail sign in page that ran from April 7th to April 9th. The sign in page reaches an average of 10 million impressions a day**
  • Our about.me team encouraged consumers to change their profile pages to help raise awareness and blogged about the event.
  • AOL Advertising offered up a Style Your Sole party to the agency who was able to best evangelize their employees to share the word.
  • MapQuest donated advertising space on top of every map today to raise awareness about the campaign.
  • AOL Artists around the world are pledging to go barefoot with AOL as well. Check out AOL Artists' Tumblr for updates on which artists are going barefoot and to see them in action.
  • Inside AOL offices, AOLers are celebrating barefoot with activations like TOMS themed pedicures and foot massages.
  • We shared the campaign in taxicab spots that ran in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and Boston (check out the video below).

We encourage you to join us in who are kicking off their shoes today to spread awareness – you may just have a big impact on a child's life.



*Contest ends 11: 59PM ET on 4/10
**Internal AOL data

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