The second annual Ad Age Digital Conference took place in San Francisco yesterday, and I was lucky enough to deliver a presentation during the video track. Entitled When Will 'Online Video' Just Be Called 'Video?', my presentation discussed the growing shift of television advertising dollars to online video and the progress that the industry has made in recent months.

With more than 200 people in the audience, I shared how new technologies and a more pronounced focus on quality content has really helped the industry to make significant strides of late. Technologies like the tablet and connected TVs have certainly made time-shifted video more accessible and media buyers are taking notice as these devices become more ubiquitous. I noted that a "new set of pipes" are being developed that allow for a better viewing experience than consumers have seen in the past. At the same time, the industry as a whole has done a much better job of investing in original web series, with "made for web" shows like our own Little Women Big Cars. In a nutshell, I highlighted how online video has matured tremendously from the days where only user-generated content was available and that, combined with new technology, have driven increased viewership.

Finally, the presentation addressed how new forms of measurement are also helping to make more of an apples to apples comparison between online video and traditional television. In the past, online video ads were often measured only in terms of clickthrough rates and completion rates with neither measure translating well to TV marketing. Newer forms of measurements, such as the partnership AOL made with Nielsen earlier this year, help media buyers to take a closer look and have a better understanding of metrics.

To read more about the Ad Age Digital Conference, check out adage.com.